Project 119: Luke 24:1-12

 |  Project 119  |  Dr. Wayne Splawn

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Project 119: Luke 23:50-56

 |  Project 119  |  Amy Hirsch

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Project 119: Luke 23:26-49

 |  Project 119  |  Ben Winder

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Pastor's Blog: Nothing to Prove

 |  Pastor's Blog  |  Dr. Doug Dortch

I’ve been reading a lot lately about how a preacher should go about dealing with the message of resurrection. You’d think that after having preached 40 years, I’d have the Easter message down. But the challenge for me in this season of the year has always been not so much what to say but how to say it. In other words, the Easter message is so familiar and the Easter crowd is always so large (swelled by the numbers of people who tend to come only that one Sunday in the year) that a preacher feels compelled to “prove” to everyone that the Resurrection of Jesus actually occurred! But somehow, “proving Easter” always seems to leave everyone a bit unsatisfied, both preacher and congregant, much like tasting an Easter dessert that everyone has been bragging about but that doesn’t quite seem to live up to its billing.

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Project 119: Luke 22:39-53

 |  Project 119  |  Amy Hirsch

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Project 119: 21:37-22:2

 |  Project 119  |  Ben Winder

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Project 119: Luke 20:9-18

 |  Project 119  |  Tim Sanderlin

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Project 119: Luke 19:45-48

 |  Project 119  |  Dr. Wayne Splawn

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Project 119: Luke 19:28-40

 |  Project 119  |  Mary Splawn

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Pastor's Blog: Sacred Time

 |  Pastor's Blog  |  Dr. Doug Dortch

Mircea Eliade was a Romanian historian of religion who taught for a number of years at the University of Chicago. Eliade’s most famous theological work, titled The Sacred and the Profane, is a treatment of that unique perspective enjoyed by people of faith, which enables them to tell the difference between ordinary experiences (profane) and supernatural ones (sacred). Sometimes in life, he contends, we believers simply find ourselves captivated by a “wholly other” phenomenon that represents an almost indescribable encounter with the divine.

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